Invest 98L isn’t a problem -yet. But it is something we definitely need to be watching here in Southwest Florida.

The big news going on right now is Hurricane Fiona. As of this morning’s update, it’s a Category 4 Hurricane with sustained winds of 130 mph. The truth is, Hurricane Fiona and Tropical Storm Gaston pose no threat to us here in Florida. It’s the next one we’re watching. Here’s the official report from NOAA:

“A tropical wave is producing shower and thunderstorm activity a couple hundred miles east of the southern Windward Islands. The system continues to show signs of organization, and it will likely become a tropical depression within the next couple of days. The disturbance is forecast to move west-northwestward across the southern Windward Islands today and then move toward the central Caribbean Sea later this week. Interests in the Windward Islands should closely monitor the progress of this system as heavy rainfall and gusty winds are affecting these islands. Regardless of development, heavy rainfall is forecast to affect northwestern Venezuela, northeastern Colombia, and the ABC island chain later this week. * Formation chance through 48 hours…high…70 percent. * Formation chance through 5 days…high…90 percent.”

Invest 98L is Likely To Become A Strong Storm

It’s still too far out to make determinations, but we are definitely in the concern phase for the possibility of something mid next week. Last year’s season was nothing, so it’s easy to get complacent. Here’s our Hurricane Guide for you to look over. Don’t start putting up your shutters or filling up gas cans just yet. We’re not at that point.

  • This morning's model runs

    The black line is the ‘mean’ or average. Currently, that’s us.

  • Here's what the radar would look like if the model runs come true

    So what do we know about projected strength? The number over the L is millibars. And there’s a chart for that.

  • Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale

    Category Wind speed Storm surge (height above normal) Atmospheric pressure (millibars) Damage
    1 74–95 mph
    (119–153 kph)
    4–5 ft
    (1.2–1.5 m)
    >979 Minimal: No real damage to buildings. Damage to unanchored mobile homes. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Some coastal flooding and minor pier damage.
    Examples: Cindy and Ophelia (2005)
    2 96–110 mph
    (154–177 kph)
    6–8 ft
    (1.8–2.4 m)
    965–979 Moderate: Some damage to building roofs, doors, and windows. Considerable damage to mobile homes. Damage to piers from flooding. Small craft in unprotected moorings may break their moorings. Some trees blown down. Evacuation of some shoreline residences and low-lying areas required.
    Example: The Perfect Storm (1991), Hurricane Isabel (2003)
    3 111–130 mph
    (178–209 kph)
    9–12 ft
    (3–4 m)
    945–964 Extensive: Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings. Large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly built signs destroyed. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by floating debris. Terrain may be flooded well inland. Evacuation of low-lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline may be required.
    Examples: Dennis, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma (2005)
    4 131–155 mph
    (210–249 kph)
    13–18 ft
    (4–5.5 m)
    920–944 Extreme: More extensive failure on non-bearing, exterior walls with some complete roof structure failure on small residences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may be flooded well inland. Massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 mi (10 km) may be required.
    Example: Galveston Hurricane of 1900
    5 >155 mph
    (249 kph)
    >18 ft
    (5.5 m)
    <920 Catastrophic: Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5 to10 mi (8 to 16 km) of the shoreline may be required.
    Example: Andrew (1992)
  • Can someone just explain this in an easy to understand way?

    This guy does an amazing job.

  • What to do now?

    Nothing, really. The storm is still developing and there’s a lot of factors at play. Especially that cold front that Mike talks about in the video. I actually began my prep last night by buying dog food and vodka. Now we just wait to see what happens.

  • Here's our guide, just in case

    Centro de Huracanes de 2022 - Guía de Preparación

    Gavins Ace Hardware Log0  sean king     powerhouse

    Este artículo está escrito en inglés.
    Para traducir, haga clic con el botón derecho del mouse en una parte en blanco de la página.
    Luego haga clic en “translate”.

     

    Hurricane Central – Preparedness Guide gives you the updated information you may need in the event of a hurricane. Just because 2021 was a quiet year for storms doesn’t mean we can ever let our guard down. This guide is sponsored by local businesses here in SWFL. Gavin’s Ace Hardware, Sean King Law, and Powerhouse Home Services.

    • Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the local hurricane evacuation route(s) to take and have a plan for where you can stay. Contact your local emergency management agency for more information.
    • Put together a go-bag: disaster supply kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, first aid supplies, medications, and copies of your critical information if you need to evacuate
    • If you are not in an area that is advised to evacuate and you decide to stay in your home, plan for adequate supplies in case you lose power and water for several days and you are not able to leave due to flooding or blocked roads.
    • Make a family emergency communication plan.
    • Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications. To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”

     

    • HURRICANE CONTACT NUMBERS

      HOTLINES
      FEMA DISASTER ASSISTANCE/REGISTRATION 800-621-3362 

      TTY: 800-462-7585

      U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 800-659-2955 

      TTY: 800-877-8339

      FEMA FRAUD HOTLINE 866-720-5721
      REPORT FALSE CLAIMS 800-323-8603
      STATE OF FLORIDA EMERGENCY INFO 24-HOUR HOTLINE 800-342-3557
      SAFE & WELLNESS HELPLINE TO SEE IF PEOPLE ARE OK OR IN A SHELTER 844-221-4160
      FINANCIAL SERVICES HURRICANE HELP LINE 800-227-8676
      RED CROSS FOOD, SHELTER AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 866-438-4636
      DCF INFORMATION 866-762-2237
      ELDER HELPLINE 800-963-5337
      ATTORNEY GENERAL’S PRICE GOUGING HOTLINE 866-966-7226
      REPORT UNLICENSED ACTIVITY 866-532-1440
      AGRICULTURAL AND CONSUMER SERVICES 800-435-7352
      DOMESTIC ANIMAL SERVICES 239-533-7387 – LEE COUNTY 

      239-252-7387 – COLLIER

    • EMERGENCY OPERATION CENTERS

      LEE 239-533-0622
      COLLIER 239-252-3600
      CHARLOTTE 941-833-4000
      DESOTO 863-993-4831
      GLADES 863-946-6020
      HENDRY 863-674-5400
    • CONTRACTOR INFORMATION

      DIVISION OF WORKERS’ COPENSATION 800-742-2214
      FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 407-260-1511
      FLORIDA WALL AND CEIILING CONTRACTORS 407-260-1313
      ASSOCIATED BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS OF FLORIDA 813-879-8064
      AMERICAN RED CROSS OFFICES
      LEE, HEDRY, GLADES AND COLLIER 239-596-6868
      CHARLOTTE & DESOTO 941-629-4345
    • POWER COMPANIES

      FPL 800-468-8243
      LCEC 800-599-2356
      GLADES ELECTRIC CO-OP 800-226-4024
      SCHOOL DISTRICT 863-674-4555 OR 863-674-4622 IN CLEWISTON
      EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 863-675-5255 OR 863-983-1594 IN CLEWISTON
      COUNTY UTILITIES 863-675-5376
      HEALTH DEPARTMENT 863-674-4041 OR 863-983-1408 IN CLEWISTON
      BUILDING & ZONING 836-675-5245 OR 863-983-1463
    • Preparing Your Home

      • Hurricane winds can cause trees and branches to fall, so before hurricane season trim or remove damaged trees and limbs to keep you and your property safe.
      • Secure loose rain gutters and downspouts and clear any clogged areas or debris to prevent water damage to your property.
      • Reduce property damage by retrofitting to secure and reinforce the roof, windows and doors, including the garage doors.
      • Purchase a portable generator or install a generator for use during power outages. Remember to keep generators and other alternate power/heat sources outside, at least 20 feet away from windows and doors and protected from moisture; and NEVER try to power the house wiring by plugging a generator into a wall outlet.
      • Consider building a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter designed for protection from high-winds and in locations above flooding levels.
    • Shelters - Lee County

      Lee County:

      Emergency Operations Center 239-533-0622

      Bonita Springs YMCA – Bonita Springs

      Island Coast High School – Cape Coral

      Estero Recreation Center – Estero

      Germain Arena – Estero

      South Fort Myers High School (Pet Friendly) – Fort Myers

      E. Lee County High School (Pet Friendly) – Lehigh Acres

      Harns Marsh Elementary School – Lehigh Acres

      Harns Marsh Middle School – Lehigh Acres

      Mirror Lakes Elementary School – Lehigh Acres

      Varsity Lakes Middle School – Lehigh Acres

      Veterans Park Recreation Center – Lehigh Acres

    • Shelters - Collier County

      Collier County

      Emergency Operations Center: 239-252-3600

      Highlands Elementary School – Immokalee

      Immokalee Friendship House – Immokalee

      Immokalee High School – Immokalee

      Immokalee Middle School – Immokalee

      Pinecrest Elementary School – Immokalee

      Village Oaks Elementary – Immokalee

      Barron Collier High School – Naples

      Big Cypress Elementary – Naples

      Corkscrew Elem/Middle School – Naples

      Cypress Palm Middle School – Naples

      Golden Gate Intermediate School – Naples

      Golden Gate Middle School – Naples

      Golden Gate High School – Naples

      Golden Terrace Intermediate School – Naples

      Gulf Coast Intermediate School – Naples

      Gulf Coast High School – Naples

      Laurel Oak Elementary School – Naples

      Lely High School – Naples

      Mike Davis Elementary School

      Naples High School

      North collier Regional Park (Pet Friendly) – Pre-registration is required

      North Naples Middle School

      Oakridge Middle School

      Palmetto Ridge High School – Special Needs

      Pelican Marsh Elementary

      Sable Palm Elementary School

      St. Matthews House

      Veterans Community Park

      Vineyards Elementary School

    • Shelters - Charlotte County

      Charlotte County

      Emergency Operations Center: 941-833-4000

      *All Charlotte County shelters are now Pet Friendly

      Lemon Bay High School – Englewood

      Myakka River Elementary School – Englewood

      Kingsway Elementary School – Port Charlotte

      Liberty Elementary School – Port Charlotte

      Meadow Park Elementary School – Port Charlotte

      Murdock Middle School – Port Charlotte

      Port Charlotte High School – Port Charlotte

      Port Charlotte Middle School – Port Charlotte

      Sallie Jones Elementary School -Punta Gorda

      South County Regional Park -Punta Gorda

      L.A. Ainger MIddle School – Rotonda

      Vineland Elementary School – Rotonda

    • Shelters - Hendry County

      Hendry County

      Emergency Operations Center: 863-674-5400

      Central Elementary School – Clewiston

      Clewiston High School – Clewiston

      Clewiston Middle School (Primary Shelter) – Clewiston

      Eastside Elementary School – Clewiston

      Westside Elementary School – Clewiston

      Country Oaks Elementary School – LaBelle

      LaBelle Elementary School – LaBelle

      LaBelle High School – LaBelle

      LaBelle Middle School (Primary Shelter) – LaBelle

       

    • Shelters - Glades County

      Glades County

      Emergency Operations Center: 863-946-6020

      Buckhead Ridge VFW – Buckhead Ridge

      Maple Grove Baptist Church – Lakeport

      Glades County Health Department (Special Needs) – Moore Haven

      Moore Haven High School – Moore Haven

      Muse Community Assn. – Muse

      West Glades Elementary (Special Needs) – Muse

    • Shelters - Desoto County

      Desoto County

      Emergency Operations Center – 863-993-4831

      Desoto Middle School -Arcadia

      South Florida State College (Special Needs) -Arcadia

    • Terminology - Hurricane Watch

      Hurricane watch = conditions possible within the next 48 hrs.

      Steps to take:

    • Terminology - Hurricane Warning

      Hurricane warning = conditions are expected within 36 hrs.

      Steps to take:

      • Follow evacuation orders from local officials, if given.
      • Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.

      Follow the hurricane timeline preparedness checklist, depending on when the storm is anticipated to hit and the impact that is projected for your location.

      • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
      • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.
      • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install.

      • Turn on your TV or radio in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
      • Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include food and water sufficient for at least three days, medications, a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
      • Plan how to communicate with family members if you lose power. For example, you can call, text, email or use social media. Remember that during disasters, sending text messages is usually reliable and faster than making phone calls because phone lines are often overloaded.
      • Review your evacuation plan with your family. You may have to leave quickly so plan ahead.
      • Keep your car in good working condition, and keep the gas tank full; stock your vehicle with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.
    • After The Hurricane

      • Listen to local officials for updates and instructions.
      • Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.
      • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.
      • Watch out for debris and downed power lines.
      • Avoid walking or driving through flood waters. Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of fast-moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
      • Avoid flood water as it may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines and may hide dangerous debris or places where the ground is washed away.
      • Photograph the damage to your property in order to assist in filing an insurance claim.
      • Do what you can to prevent further damage to your property, (e.g., putting a tarp on a damaged roof), as insurance may not cover additional damage that occurs after the storm.